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Author Topic: So just how long does a well pump last?  (Read 7333 times)
RECHRGD
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« on: August 06, 2007, 08:49:17 PM »

I've lived out in the woods of Eastern Washington for over 15 years now.  The house was built in 1985 so the pump is at least 22 years old.  It's a Berkley 3/4 hp 240 volt single phase pump about 5' off the bottom of a 350' deep well with a static level of 50' that produces between 7 and 8 gpm.  I would have thought that it would have failed by now, but it just keeps pumping away like the Energizer Bunny.  It's hanging on galvanized pipe, so replacement won't be cheap when required.  Also the pressure tank is original with no problems.  I replaced the water heater just because, when we did some remodeling 15 years ago and again no problems.  Will this thing ever give up?  There are old uranium mines in the area, so maybe I've got some highly coveted uranium water that doesn't corrode or something.  I haven't grown any extra limbs or anything yet.   Bob
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Chargen69
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« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2007, 09:41:24 PM »

20 years on galvanized pipe is about all you can expect.  I would expect it to begin to have little tiny leaks anyday.  As far as the pump, it could last a day, a year, five more years, just depends on the kind of life it has had up to this point.

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bandit67
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« Reply #2 on: August 06, 2007, 10:15:36 PM »

I have a Ruth Berry and think they one of the best for a shallow well. I rebuild the pump about every 15 years and replace the bearing in the motor about the same time. Pump parts are the impeller and seals.........great unit and I will be using one on my new homeplace. I replace the piping and footvalve at the same time.  Have been pretty lucky with this routine.
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Bob
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« Reply #3 on: August 07, 2007, 04:45:06 AM »

I don't know the brand of the one in the house I just sold but the original pump is still working since 1972. 4 years ago my wife and I pulled it out and had it checked by a well company and it came back with an A.

Bob
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RECHRGD
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« Reply #4 on: August 07, 2007, 08:45:20 AM »

When it comes time to replace it, I'd like to use the plastic piping.  Is there a limit to what depth you can go with that stuff?    Thanks, Bob
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Chargen69
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« Reply #5 on: August 07, 2007, 03:45:27 PM »

not really, depending on how long of pipe you can find, you can always splice into it and add more.
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bandit67
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« Reply #6 on: August 07, 2007, 07:51:36 PM »

The plastic pipe, usually lasts quite a while. Unless you have an extreme amount on minerals , like calcium, the PVC pipe should last longer than you.  It's the galvanized connect pipes the corrode rather quickly.  The foot valve will need replace ment bout every 15 years , give or take a few years.   I suggest that , if you have not done so already, to wire up a light outside your pump house that you see from your living room or bedroom that will burn whenever your pump is running. I have mine  covered with a red globe, and it gives off a warm glow , and is not very distracting to neighbors.  This way , if you see your pump kick on and nobody is calling for water , then you know  your foot valve is leaking by......or a pipe is leaking or broken somewhere under the house.  Now if you have a submersable pump, you will just know when your pump is running.......
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Bob
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« Reply #7 on: August 08, 2007, 05:03:20 AM »

When it comes time to replace it, I'd like to use the plastic piping.  Is there a limit to what depth you can go with that stuff?    Thanks, Bob

Ours had the plastic pipe. It is easier to pull out. All you need is use a make shift a-frame or do like we did. I pulled it up and my wife drug it across the yard. Ours was only about 100 feet down with 36 gpm. My well at the new house has the plastic pipe at 150 feet and 47 gpm. I guess to answer your question about depth is to consult a well company.

Bob
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6pkrunner
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« Reply #8 on: August 08, 2007, 09:25:19 AM »

I've got a 3/4 hp at 150 feet. Its been in there for 22 years. Foot valve went about 10 years ago. Replaced it with a brass one. No problems since.
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chargermick
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« Reply #9 on: August 08, 2007, 05:52:59 PM »

What is a foot valve?
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RECHRGD
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« Reply #10 on: August 08, 2007, 08:57:21 PM »

Thanks for the replies guys.  I guess I'll just keep some money in the bank for the day that it fails.  Chargermick, A foot valve is really just a check valve at the bottom of the pipes on a jet pump (the pump is located above ground) that keeps the water from draining back out of the lines after the pump shuts off, thereby keeping the pressure in the tank.  It serves the same purpose as the check valve at the outlet of a submersable pump (what I have) in a deeper well.  Bob
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RECHRGD
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« Reply #11 on: December 29, 2013, 07:47:15 PM »

Well, it's been over seven years since I asked these questions and it's still pumping away.  No pipe leaks, no tank leaks and no water heater problems.  Must have good mojo....
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Chargen69
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« Reply #12 on: December 29, 2013, 09:41:11 PM »

pride goeth before a fall

 icon_smile_big
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RECHRGD
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« Reply #13 on: December 29, 2013, 09:50:28 PM »

 rofl rofl I know, I know.....
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A383Wing
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« Reply #14 on: December 29, 2013, 09:56:50 PM »

Well, it's been over seven years since I asked these questions and it's still pumping away.  No pipe leaks, no tank leaks and no water heater problems.  Must have good mojo....

don't jinx it now
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twodko
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« Reply #15 on: December 29, 2013, 11:07:15 PM »

I have a 132' deep well that was drilled 12+ years ago. It functioned flawlessly until this year, cost me $1600 for a new pump, wiring and controller.
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tsmithae
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« Reply #16 on: December 29, 2013, 11:15:35 PM »

I just replaced my folks pump, was about 60-75" and was last replaced about 20yrs ago. 
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« Reply #17 on: December 30, 2013, 12:22:28 AM »

 I wonder? Twocents 350' of galvanized pipe, in 21' sections = 16+ sections, 32 threaded ends, the pipe will rust away at the threaded ends, mostly above the water line. Hope the pump is tied fast with a rope. Maybe extra heavy pipe was used. yesnod
bandit67's idea with the light is very good.
Keep in mind if you pull 350' of hard pipe, it don't bend, and if it snaps at the threaded joints, and all the pipe and the pump in the casing fall down, you do not want to be holding the rope in your hands as the pipe and pump are going down the casing!
As you pull the pipe you will have to unscrew each joint till you get to the pump.
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