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Author Topic: Wing work  (Read 1692 times)
41husk
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« on: February 15, 2011, 11:47:31 AM »

The top of my wing is starting to slant.  What size allen wrench do I need to readjust the wing?
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nascarxx29
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« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2011, 11:52:30 AM »

Im not exactly sure .But I think its 3/8 allen wrench 7/16 bolt shaft
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« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2011, 12:00:27 PM »

I can't remember what size it is. Dane could probably tell you. It has the limiters built in so it won't slant very far.
I thought we had it pretty tight. If you ever remove the  bolt completely, be sure to put some anti-sieze on it so that it won't corrode and sieze up.
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Charles Addams
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« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2011, 12:28:18 PM »

I was planning on just loosening enough, to put it back in place then retighten.
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1969 Dodge Charger 500 440/727
1970 Challenger convertible 340/727
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1974 Dodge Dart /6/904
1983 Plymouth Scamp GT 2.2 Auto
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moparstuart
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« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2011, 03:35:56 PM »

  leave it a little slanted and get some down force   smilielol smilielol smilielol   
  I leave mine loose enough i can move it around alittle for effect at car shows , but when i put it back in place it usually stays put .
 
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Troy
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« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2011, 04:20:35 PM »

  leave it a little slanted and get some down force   smilielol smilielol smilielol   
  I leave mine loose enough i can move it around alittle for effect at car shows , but when i put it back in place it usually stays put .
 
Exactly! But not really. The wing actually generates down force when it's level (0 degrees to the air flow, not necessarily horizontal I suppose). It doesn't become neutral until 4 degrees negative (nose facing up in this case).

Troy
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« Reply #6 on: February 15, 2011, 04:34:54 PM »

  scratchchin
 Just curious but what are the Lbs. of downforce in the neutural position?.. any handeling advantage at Reg. Freeway speeds?.. Say 70-80  MPH?  or,..  do wingcars need to be in tripple digits to see or feel the stability from the wing come into play?..  Would  increasing the downward angle increase the  grip on turns at a lower speed?..  shruggy
 
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« Reply #7 on: February 15, 2011, 05:24:03 PM »

The down force increases with speed obviously. Wink I posted some numbers I crunched using a NASA simulator around here somewhere (might have been the old site). If I remember right, below 60 mph there's not much going on (small, thin wing without a huge amount of surface area). You have to remember though that the other parts of the aero package (nose, rear window, A-pillar trim) also contribute to the over all down force and how the car slips through the air and sticks to the road. More down force also means more drag so there's a happy medium in there somewhere for the speed you want to run. In other words, you can't crank the wing to 14 degrees down and hope to run 200 mph.

Troy
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« Reply #8 on: February 15, 2011, 05:27:04 PM »

The down force increases with speed obviously. Wink I posted some numbers I crunched using a NASA simulator around here somewhere (might have been the old site). If I remember right, below 60 mph there's not much going on (small, thin wing without a huge amount of surface area). You have to remember though that the other parts of the aero package (nose, rear window, A-pillar trim) also contribute to the over all down force and how the car slips through the air and sticks to the road. More down force also means more drag so there's a happy medium in there somewhere for the speed you want to run. In other words, you can't crank the wing to 14 degrees down and hope to run 200 mph.

Troy


   scratchchin So,.. I guess that's why WRX's have wings the size of a ping-pong table...  scratchchin
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« Reply #9 on: February 15, 2011, 07:08:05 PM »

The down force increases with speed obviously. Wink I posted some numbers I crunched using a NASA simulator around here somewhere (might have been the old site). If I remember right, below 60 mph there's not much going on (small, thin wing without a huge amount of surface area). You have to remember though that the other parts of the aero package (nose, rear window, A-pillar trim) also contribute to the over all down force and how the car slips through the air and sticks to the road. More down force also means more drag so there's a happy medium in there somewhere for the speed you want to run. In other words, you can't crank the wing to 14 degrees down and hope to run 200 mph.

Troy


   scratchchin So,.. I guess that's why WRX's have wings the size of a ping-pong table...  scratchchin
And that's what kicked off my "research" - Neal J going off about the big wings on ricers. He claimed the down force would lift the front (drive) wheels off the ground so the wings were pointless. Not so - most are useless since they're generally installed at 0 degrees.

Troy
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DAY CLONA
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« Reply #10 on: February 15, 2011, 09:27:13 PM »

All the lift/down force values of every component bolted/mounted/moulded  in to/on to the 69/70 and yes 71 windtunnel test cars/models is recorded in the 300+ page Chrysler  windtunnel test report, makes for a good read, and understanding of how all the components interact/effect with one another

Mike
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« Reply #11 on: February 15, 2011, 11:49:04 PM »

where can one find a copy of this report?
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DAY CLONA
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« Reply #12 on: February 16, 2011, 05:38:12 AM »

where can one find a copy of this report?



Greg K. has one, I also viewed an original at Richard Petty's shop, and IIRC I believe the Aero Warriors sit still has some of the written text on his website, as well as the pics of the 71 windtest models


* 71testcone.jpg (42.23 KB, 279x421 - viewed 239 times.)
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