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Author Topic: 6 pack CFM  (Read 6555 times)
boss429kiwi
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« on: May 14, 2011, 09:20:25 PM »

Hi

What is the CFM of each carb on a 6 pack? Total =?

I have read mixed information, from 550cfm of each carb to 1000cfm total?

Thanks
Gary
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440mop
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« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2011, 12:28:32 AM »

I thought it was 1350 CFM total; 350 on the center and 500 on the outboards.
John
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DAY CLONA
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« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2011, 02:05:15 AM »

I thought it was 1350 CFM total; 350 on the center and 500 on the outboards.
John




Correct,...the only difference is the 340 manual trans center carb, 4791, that carb has a 355 CFM rating,.....other than that all 340/440 set ups are 1350 CFM total
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b5blue
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« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2011, 06:07:58 AM »

Yup...1350 CFM  cheers Many do not know this system was developed by Holley first on Vett's, the 427 I think.  Twocents
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UFO
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« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2011, 06:31:10 AM »

Yes 1350 cfm. However how they measure the flow is different between 2bbl and 4bbl's.
If you used the same formula the 6 bbl setup comes in at IIRC 960 cfm.
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FJ5WING
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« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2011, 06:47:48 AM »

Yes 1350 cfm. However how they measure the flow is different between 2bbl and 4bbl's.
If you used the same formula the 6 bbl setup comes in at IIRC 960 cfm.

not real clear on what youre saying...
why would you measure a 2BBL the same way as a 4BBL?
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elacruze
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« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2011, 07:34:44 AM »

Yes 1350 cfm. However how they measure the flow is different between 2bbl and 4bbl's.
If you used the same formula the 6 bbl setup comes in at IIRC 960 cfm.

not real clear on what youre saying...
why would you measure a 2BBL the same way as a 4BBL?

For a reason I can't know, 2bbl carbs are measured at twice the manifold vacuum of 4bbl.

http://www.strokerkits.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=83:carburetor-cfm-rules&catid=41:tech-info&Itemid=80
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b5blue
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« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2011, 09:47:40 AM »

That would only apply to a single 2 bbl not a 6 bbl setup, I'm thinking..... scratchchin
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Rolling_Thunder
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« Reply #8 on: May 15, 2011, 11:22:09 AM »

Yes 1350 cfm. However how they measure the flow is different between 2bbl and 4bbl's.
If you used the same formula the 6 bbl setup comes in at IIRC 960 cfm.

 2thumbs   Bingo
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1968 Dodge Charger - 6.1L Hemi / 6-speed / 3.55 Sure Grip

2013 Dodge Challenger R/T - 5.7L Hemi / 6-speed / 3.73 Limited Slip

1964 Dodge Polara 500 - 440 / 4-speed / 3.91 Sure Grip

1973 Dodge Challenger Rallye - 340 / A-518 / 3.23 Sure Grip
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« Reply #9 on: May 15, 2011, 12:17:52 PM »

once again I ask...why would you measure a 4BBl the same as the 2BBL.....its NOT a 4BBL, correct?
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Rolling_Thunder
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« Reply #10 on: May 15, 2011, 04:03:05 PM »

CFM ratings are more accurate than physical carburetor sizes, as the CFM rating takes into account the venturi size of the carburetor. It is not uncommon for a given physical size (see Carburetor sizes paragraphs) to have many different internal venturi sizes. Early Stromberg and Zenith carbs could have as many as 9 different venturi sizes for a given physical size. Carburetor CFM ratings have been around since at least the 1920’s; however many O.E. (original equipment) carburetors never had published CFM ratings. I have not seen any actual agreement that stated that it had to be this way, but the early published ratings that I have seen for 1-barrel and 2-barrel carburetors were measured at 3 inches of mercury. This rating was about the amount of vacuum available on engines of the period under wide-open throttle conditions.

 

Sometime during the 1950’s, engineers found that a passenger engine with a four-barrel carburetor would not maintain a vacuum of 3 inches of mercury at wide-open throttle; and by some convention 1 ˝ inches of mercury was chosen for rating 4-barrel carburetors. The ratings for 1-barrel and 2-barrel carburetors were left unchanged.

 

To convert from one system to another (with a very small percentage of error) is relatively simple. Simply use the square root of 2 (1.414). Thus to convert a two-barrel rating into a four-barrel rating, divide the two-barrel rating by 1.414. To convert the four-barrel rating to a two-barrel rating, multiply the four-barrel rating by 1.414.

 

This worked very well up through the mid-1960’s, when carburetor comparison tests became popular in car magazines. One carburetor company determined that the results could be skewed by rating their carburetors “dry” (air only), instead of the conventional “wet” (a non-flamable liquid with the density property of gasoline and air mixed). Rating the carburetor dry would add approximately 8 percent to the rating (example – a carburetor rated on the four-barrel rating scale at 500 CFM would now amazingly flow 540 CFM).

 

As the general public was unaware of the “wet” versus “dry”, this system worked fairly well until the mid-1980’s when it seems that other scales were “needed”. No attempt will be made to explain ratings of carburetors produced after 1980. The best way to compare these units would be throttle area (which was a measurement used back in the 1950’s and 1960’s); or more accurately, the comparitive area of the main venturi. On the later carburetors, best to write to the company, and ask at what vacuum the carburetor was tested, and whether it was tested wet or dry. If this information cannot be obtained, then the rating is suspect.


Info found at The Carbeuretor Shop LLC.
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1968 Dodge Charger - 6.1L Hemi / 6-speed / 3.55 Sure Grip

2013 Dodge Challenger R/T - 5.7L Hemi / 6-speed / 3.73 Limited Slip

1964 Dodge Polara 500 - 440 / 4-speed / 3.91 Sure Grip

1973 Dodge Challenger Rallye - 340 / A-518 / 3.23 Sure Grip
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